Facts & Figures

  • Economy, trade and investment

    • An increase of 1,000 passengers a year between two countries sees trade increase by as much as £920,000. Extrapolating these figures shows that £128m additional annual trade could result from one new daily route, or £1bn from a new daily route to all eight high-growth economies (these high-growth economies are China, India, Brazil, Russia, Indonesia, Mexico, Turkey and South Korea)
    • London has no daily flights to 10 emerging economies: 26 cities in those economies are served by daily flights from other European cities
    • The aviation sector supports 921,000 British jobs, with 326,000 jobs directly supported by the industry
    • The aviation sector contributes £49.6bn (3.6%) to national GDP; in addition there are £20.7bn in ‘catalytic’ benefits through tourism which raises the overall contribution to £70.3bn (5%)
    • Britain has the world’s second largest aviation manufacturing sector
    • Heathrow has good links with Hong Kong but only three to five flights a day to other cities in China (which are only Beijing and Shanghai). Paris CDG has 11 daily flights to four Chinese destinations and Frankfurt has ten daily flights to six Chinese destinations
    • London has fewer weekly flights than Paris, Frankfurt, Amsterdam, Munich and Madrid to half of the emerging market economies, and seven of the eight growth economies identified by the IMF
    • 20 times more trade is done with countries with which Britain has a direct air link. Trade flows have increased more quickly with emerging markets served by daily flight connections than those without
    • 40% (by value) of Britain’s exports go by air and over 30% of UK imports (by value) arrive by air freight
  • Environment and noise

    • At Heathrow, between 1980 and 2006 the number of people affected by noise fell from two million to around 250,000 despite a 75% growth in flights. Similar levels of noise from road traffic, measured in the same way, on average and across the day, affect over two million people in London; while similar levels of noise from trains affects almost 300,000 people
    • Emissions from air transport currently account for only about 6% of the UK’s total
    • The government has committed to ensuring 2050 emissions from air transport do not exceed 2005 levels. When taking improvements to aircraft engines, bodies and fuels a 55% growth in flights by 2050 is compatible with achieving overall carbon reduction targets. This means a maximum of 3.4 million flights (ATMs) a year, up from 2.1 million today
  • Runways, demand and passenger numbers

    • More than 200 million passengers go through UK airports every year, 134 million through London alone
    • All of London’s main airports are forecast to be full by the mid-2020s
    • Demand for flights in the UK is forecast to double by 2050 while demand for business flights is forecast to grow 80% by 2030
    • Britain hasn’t built a new full- length runway in the South East since the Second World War
    • Britain has seen a fourfold increase in air travel in the last three decades
    • In the last 20 years demand for London’s airports has grown 50%

Economy, trade and investment

  • The aviation sector contributes £49.6bn (3.6%) to national GDP; in addition there are £20.7bn in ‘catalytic’ benefits through tourism which raises the overall contribution to £70.3bn (5%)
  • The aviation sector supports 921,000 British jobs, with 326,000 jobs directly supported by the industry
  • Britain has the world’s second largest aviation manufacturing sector
  • London has fewer weekly flights than Paris, Frankfurt, Amsterdam, Munich and Madrid to half of the emerging market economies, and seven of the eight growth economies identified by the IMF
  • London has no daily flights to 10 emerging economies: 26 cities in those economies are served by daily flights  from other European cities
  • Heathrow has good links with Hong Kong but only three to five flights a day to other cities in China (which are only Beijing and Shanghai). Paris CDG has 11 daily flights to four Chinese destinations and Frankfurt has ten daily flights to six Chinese destinations
  • An increase of 1,000 passengers a year between two countries sees trade increase by as much as £920,000. Extrapolating these figures shows that £128m additional annual trade could result from one new daily route, or £1bn from a new daily route to all eight high-growth economies (these high-growth economies are China, India, Brazil, Russia, Indonesia, Mexico, Turkey and South Korea)
  • 20 times more trade is done with countries with which Britain has a direct air link. Trade flows have increased more quickly with emerging markets served by daily flight connections than those without
  • 40% (by value) of Britain’s exports go by air and over 30% of UK imports (by value) arrive by air freight

Runways, Demand & Passenger Numbers

  • Britain hasn’t built a new full- length runway in the South East since the Second World War
  • All of London’s main airports are forecast to be full by the mid-2020s
  • More than 200 million passengers go through UK airports every year, 134 million through London alone
  • Britain has seen a fourfold increase in air travel in the last three decades
  • In the last 20 years demand for London’s airports has grown 50%
  • Demand for flights in the UK is forecast to double by 2050 while demand for business flights is forecast to grow 80% by 2030

Environment and Noise

  • The government has committed to ensuring 2050 emissions from air transport do not exceed 2005 levels. When taking improvements to aircraft engines, bodies and fuels a 55% growth in flights by 2050 is compatible with achieving overall carbon reduction targets. This means a maximum of 3.4 million flights (ATMs) a year, up from 2.1 million today
  • Emissions from air transport currently account for only about 6% of the UK’s total
  • At Heathrow, between 1980 and 2006 the number of people affected by noise fell from two million to around 250,000 despite a 75% growth in flights. Similar levels of noise from road traffic, measured in the same way, on average and across the day, affect over two million people in London; while similar levels of noise from trains affects almost 300,000 people